Assistance Dogs in the Workplace: Wayne Wicklund and Snow Shadow

Hearing Dog Snow.Hearing Dog Snow helps Wayne Wicklund with his work as a computer tech and webmaster.

In the International Assistance Dog Week newsletter, we’ve been asking people to share their stories of their dogs in the workplace. Anne Wicklund wrote in from Arizona about her husband Wayne’s hearing dog, Snow, and Snow’s successor, Snow Shadow.

I have to tell you how valuable our service dog is to my husband. He is always at his side – of course – and has saved his life many times. Our Snow passed in September and his successor Snow Shadow is only 10 months old and already bossing his dad around.

Shadow:

• makes sure my husband goes to bed by 8 pm because HE knows Wayne is ill and/or tired,

• Shadow won’t let Wayne walk when he knows Wayne is too ill and too tired, and drags Wayne home

• When Wayne is away from home and becomes disoriented and confused, Shadow sits and waits for Wayne to recover then pulls him home or to the car

• Shadow alerts Wayne when needs his meds or inhaler

• Shadow alerts on sounds and danger, and people too close for comfort

• Shadow alerts on smells, allergic reactions and chemicals that shut down Wayne’s lungs

• Shadow braces Wayne until he regains his balance

Wayne works from home and volunteers at our local Museum –he is webmaster for the website, tech for all their computers, and volunteers at the VA for Viet Nam Veterans. Wayne and Shadow attend numerous political functions locally and around the world and travel extensively

Snow Prince and Snow Shadow have inspired the writing and publication of two books: “My Ears Have a Wet Nose: Acquiring, Training & Loving a Hearing Dog,” and “I Have a Wet Nose . . . and I have a job,” an educational coloring book about service dogs. The next book will be published in 2014, which is a “Handbook for Service Dogs: The do’s and don’ts.”


Read about Snow the chamber ambassador

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International Assistance Dog Week 2014 is August 3-9. Learn more about IADW and subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.assistancedogweek.org/about/.

Tell us how your assistance dog helped you to get and/or keep your job. Send in photos of you and your assistance dog at work. You can send your stories and photos to workinglikedogs@gmail.com.

Assistance Dogs in the Workplace: Lisa Loftis and Diabetes Alert Dog Ija

High School teacher Lisa Loftis and her Diabetes Alert Dog, Ija,  work at the Creative Education Preparatory Institute (CEPI).High School teacher Lisa Loftis and her Diabetes Alert Dog, Ija, work at the Creative Education Preparatory Institute (CEPI).

In the International Assistance Dog Week newsletter, we’ve been asking people to share their stories of their dogs in the workplace.

Here’s the story shared with us by Lisa Loftis.
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Language Arts teacher Lisa Loftis and her Diabetes Alert Dog, Ija, go to work each day during the school year at the Creative Education Preparatory Institute (CEPI),  a small charter high school in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Ija, whose name is pronounced with a long “e” sound to start, and ends with a sound like the last part of amnesia, Lisa says, has been paired with Lisa for about a year and a half. This was after about a year and a half of training.

Ija has helped Lisa a lot, alerting her to high or low blood sugar levels 15 – 20 minutes before her best equipment can. Lisa loves being a teacher and enjoys helping her students. Having Ija with her means Lisa loses much less teaching time

Everything went smoothly when Ija joined Lisa on the job. For one thing, the school administration at CEPI was fully aware that Lisa was training with Ija, and that Ija would be coming to school with Lisa when her training was complete. The students were also supportive. Key Club members even organized a fundraising project to help with expenses.

Ija was the first assistance dog at the school, and the school director had a few questions and concerns, but was very supportive. The administration just asked Lisa to keep Ija with her at all times and to keep her on leash. Whether in the classroom or the lunchroom, Ija is with Lisa.

A school visit by a dog trainer from Assistance Dogs of the West, the organization in Santa Fe that trained Ija, helped both the students and teachers at CEPI learn more about what Ija was trained to do and how they should behave around her.

Some students do still ask to pet Ija, but Lisa just tells them that they can pet her after they graduate. Then when her former students come back to CEPI to visit and tell Lisa what they’re doing, she makes good on her promise. Otherwise the students know that Ija is on the job, and shouldn’t be distracted.

Lisa also hears from students sometimes that they feel sorry for Ija because they think all she does is work. So Lisa started a Facebook page, in part to post pictures showing Ija when she’s not working. Ija enjoys swimming and hiking, going on vacation out-of-state during the summer, and sometimes just hanging out at home, lounging on the sofa.   

Whether at school, out for dinner, or visiting a doctor’s office, Lisa says the best confirmation that Ija is a well-trained assistance dog is hearing people say, “Oh, I didn’t even know your dog was with you,” when they see Ija get up and leave with her.

In addition to that, of course, is the fact that Ija is constantly attentive to Lisa, monitoring her diabetes and alerting her when needed. Having Ija on the job means Lisa can be better at her job of teaching high school students.
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Read this longer article about Lisa and Ija written by Kate Kelly: http://americacomesalive.com/2014/08/04/diabetic-alert-dog-permits-teacher-live-normally/

International Assistance Dog Week 2014 is August 3-9. Learn more about IADW and subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.assistancedogweek.org/about/.

Tell us how your assistance dog helped you to get and/or keep your job. Send in photos of you and your assistance dog at work. You can send your stories and photos to workinglikedogs@gmail.com.

Assistance Dogs in the Workplace: Kathy Taylor and Hearing Dog Janet

Kathy Taylor and Hearing Dog Janet driving to workKathy Taylor and her CCI Hearing Dog Janet travel a lot for Kathy’s job as a System Designer-Engineer with CenturyLink

In the May issue of the International Assistance Dog Week newsletter, we asked people to share their stories of their dogs in the workplace.

Here is a story shared by Kathy Taylor.  
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From the moment I received my Hearing Dog Janet in the spring of 2008 from Canine Companions for Independence, we hit the road working as a team across the nation deploying business CPE (customer premises equipment) products for CenturyLink. I work in field operations as a System Designer-Engineer which requires extensive traveling to customer sites.

When the alarm goes off in the morning it’s a bouncing Labrador that greets me; if a co-worker should happen to knock on my hotel door I no longer miss the opportunity to meet for breakfast or perhaps join in going out as a group for dinner.

No longer do I have to sleep sitting up at night with my hearing aids in for fear of missing my early morning flight, for Janet will keep nudging me until I get up. Now I can rest peacefully knowing if the fire alarms should go off in the night, Janet will nudge me awake.

Also, while driving to customer sites, if Janet hears any police/fire or emergency sirens, she will nudge me. In May of this year while on a business trip in Alabama when tornados were moving thru the area, it was Janet that alerted me to the tornado sirens and led me from my third floor hotel room to safety.

While at home I no longer miss people ringing the door bell or knocking on the back door. Nor do I miss the oven timers, microwave timers, or dryer signals, as Janet will simply nudge me and lead me to the sound sources.

For the first time in my life I can now visit a doctor’s / dentist office and not have to scope the room out to sit facing the exam room hallway in order to watch for the assistant to call my name. I can now sit wherever I wish and read a magazine / book or simply watch the lobby TV. When my name is called, Janet will nudge my leg and sit up, wanting to lead me to the assistant who has called my name.

It may not sound like much but in the past, no matter how much I informed office employees, the message of my hearing impairment never quite made it to the person calling my name over and over again. My appointment has even been skipped because I failed to hear the office staff call my name, but not anymore, all because of Janet.

There is not a day that goes by that Janet doesn’t display excellence and devotion, all for a scratch and a pat.
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Recent newspaper article featuring Kathy and Janet: http://www.journalgazette.net/article/20140705/LOCAL/307059984

This year International Assistance Dog Week is August 3-9. Learn more about IADW and subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.assistancedogweek.org/about/.

Tell us how your assistance dog helped you to get and/or keep your job. Send in photos of you and your assistance dog at work. You can send your stories and photos to workinglikedogs@gmail.com.

Is your holiday party going to the dogs?

December 5, 2013 · Posted in Assistance Dogs, Guide Dogs, People, Public Interaction, Service Dogs · Comment 
Older man and his dogWhistle likes the holidays but isn’t sure about the reindeer antlers he’s wearing right now

As the holidays roll around again, many of us are preparing to host an annual holiday party. As you prepare your guest list, does it include someone partnered with an assistance dog? And if so, do you know how to make sure all your guests, both human and canine, feel welcome?

While most people are familiar with guide dogs that assist individuals who are blind or have partial vision loss, there are a variety of assistance dogs trained to help people impacted by spinal cord injury, hearing loss, post traumatic stress disorders, diabetes, or some other medical need.

More and more people with medical and physical limitations are discovering how assistance dogs can enhance their daily lives. There are multiple types of assistance dogs that provide an array of physical and mental support to their human partners.

Service dogs assist their human partners by carrying or retrieving items, pushing buttons (for example, on an elevator), opening and closing drawers, providing assistance with balance while dressing, helping with household chores and much more.

Hearing alert dogs alert individuals with hearing loss to specific sounds, including phones, doorbells, sirens, smoke alarms, crying babies and other humans.

Medical alert dogs respond to various types of medical events such as epileptic seizures, changes in blood sugar, heart attack, stroke, cancer and other potential medical emergencies. These dogs may be trained to alert their owner of an approaching medical event, pull an emergency cord, lick their owner’s face to notify him/her, or even retrieve the phone for a 911 call. Some dogs possess the ability to predict a medical event and will become restless or push against their partners to warn them.

When you invite someone who is partnered with an assistance dog into your home for a social gathering, there are some things that you need to be aware of in order to ensure that all your guests feel welcome. People are often confused about how they should behave around a working dog. After all, who can resist a gorgeous working dog, especially at a festive event?

It is important to recognize that although this is a social event and your guest is attending as a partygoer, their assistance dog is on the job and not in party mode. Your guest is dependent on their assistance dog for one or more medical needs. It is important not to distract their assistance dog. You should never speak directly to the dog or offer any type of food without first seeking the owner’s permission.

I often refer to assistance dogs as highly trained Olympic athletes who may be on special diets with strict feeding schedules. Unsolicited attention and food can be distracting to the dog and could be detrimental to their human partner’s safety and independence.

If you are aware your guest is partnered with an assistance dog, check in with him or her ahead of time and ask if there is anything you can do to accommodate him and his assistance dog while they are at the party. Share with him the best place to toilet his canine partner and ask if you can provide any water or snacks while the dog is at the party.

If you are hosting the party at your home and you have pets, consider placing your pets in a comfortable area away from the assistance dog and his human partner. Your family pets may not understand why a strange dog has entered their home and territory. Segregating the animals provides a safer environment and can reduce unnecessary stress.

When you are preparing the party area and placing chairs and other décor, consider allowing ample space for your guest and her assistance dog. You don’t want to isolate them but, you want to provide enough access area for the team to easily negotiate the area and mingle with other guests.

If you are really striving to be the “hostess with the mostess,” you may want to be aware of how other party goers are interacting with the working dog. Are they fearful of the dog or are they paying too much attention to the working dog? If so, you may need to provide some gentle reminders that this is a working dog and guests should not be touching or addressing the dog directly. You and your guests should always speak directly to the individual partnered with the dog. And, no one should pet the working dog without asking permission from their human partner.

Some of your other guests may be anxious or nervous about an assistance dog at the party. Don’t be afraid to reassure them that assistance dogs are highly trained to provide a variety of critical services to their human partner. Party goers with assistance dogs deserve the same respect as other party goers. That being said, you do have the right to ask the dog to leave if it is not behaving appropriately and jeopardizes the safety of other guests.

Keep it simple and remember these tips to ensure that everyone remains in the holiday spirit whenever they are meeting or approaching a working assistance dog and his or her human partner:

  • Do not touch the Assistance Dog, or the person it assists, without permission.
  • Do not make noises at the Assistance Dog; it may distract the animal from doing its job.
  • Do not feed the Assistance Dog; it may disrupt his/her schedule and diet.
  • Do not be offended if the person does not feel like discussing his/her disability or the assistance the dog provides. Not everyone wants to be a walking-talking “show and tell” exhibit.

Remember, it’s the holidays and everyone just wants to relax and enjoy the doggone party!!

Meeting new dogs: What’s the best approach?

January 27, 2013 · Posted in Assistance Dogs, Public Interaction, Service Dogs · Comment 
Service dog Whistle and his friend, BuenoService dog Whistle and his new friend, Bueno, after their first meeting

 

As an experienced assistance dog handler, you may consider yourself to be a total “dog person,” but that doesn’t mean you should assume it’s OK to approach every unknown dog.  For me and Whistle, getting up close and personal isn’t always the best approach.

When I am out alone with Whistle and an unknown dog approaches us, it always makes me somewhat leery until I can discern whether the unknown dog is friendly or unfriendly.

Experts at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine give guidelines on various situations and say that in many cases, it’s best to not approach unknown dogs at all.

  • Is the dog tethered with no person with them?
    An unattended dog on a leash or tether might be more aggressive than usual.  Even a wagging tail is not a surefire sign of a happy dog.  It can also mean the dog is excited or aggressive. If the dog is in “his territory,” such as their yard, it could be an even worse situation, with the dog feeling trapped and that he needs to defend his territory.
  • Is the dog leashed with their owner?
    Always ask permission before approaching any dog, no matter how friendly they might appear. Once you have permission, invite the dog to approach you rather than vice versa.  Don’t pet the dog on top of his head but offer a closed hand for him to sniff. Use a soft voice.
  • Is the dog unleashed with their owner?
    Whether you’re in a dog park or out on the street where the owner just isn’t following the leash law, it is not safe to initiate an interaction with the dog. In this scenario a dog might feel like it needs to protect the owner.
  • Is the dog unleashed with no owner nearby?
    Avoid contact with dogs in this situation. You really can’t always read the dog’s body language. If the dog approaches you and appears aggressive, you should stand still and avoid eye contact.

When I got my first assistance dog, I was trained to use my wheelchair as a buffer between an unknown dog and my service dog. And, in an extreme case, I was taught how to use my wheelchair to protect myself and my dog. Fortunately, I have only had to use this tactic once or twice during my life with a service dog partner. But, I can tell you that the aggressive dog did not like having a 200 pound wheelchair roll over his paw and it was a great diversion to give me and my dog some time to get out of that situation.

In one extreme case, my husband, Franz, had to intervene when a unknown dog came running out of a florist shop to attack Ramona when she and I were entering an outside elevator in Washington, D.C. Franz had to get aggressive with the dog in order to get him to stop the attack. It was a scary experience and it definitely had a negative impact on Ramona’s psyche. After that incident, she became more sensitive to unknown dogs.

Have you had any issues with unknown dogs? And, if so, what tactic worked for you and your assistance dog?

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