Tech Talk with Intel: Will Robotic Dogs Guide the Blind?

A dog and a person.Will robots and other technology replace guide dogs?

I’ll never forget the first day of service dog team training. One of the first things the trainers told us was, “Your new dog is not a robot.” And, here we are 20 years later talking about robots as assistance dogs.

Intel’s technology, as it relates to assistance dogs, was recently discussed in an article by Scott Jung, iQ Contributor & Senior Editor at MedGadget. During International Assistance Dog Week, Intel suggested technologies that honor not only the dogs that faithfully guide the visually impaired to greater independence, but also the work they inspire.

The report explains that because guide dogs can’t go everywhere, and can’t live with everyone, doctors, engineers, and scientists are developing technology that can help people with visual impairment.

In Japan an electronics company and a university have teamed up to work on guide robots. The project, which has been underway since 2009, now has refined their earlier models, which look less like R2-D2 and operate more like a dog now, with four robotic legs that can climb stairs, and the ability to respond to verbal instructions.

Other companies around the world are working on wearable technology, like the Eyeronman, a vest which uses LIDAR, a sort of laser radar, to detect obstacles. Smart glasses that use technology to enhance vision are another strategy being explored. And there’s the BrainPort, which converts images seen by a video camera into an “image” the user feels on his tongue.

As the article concludes, “While robots and wearable devices don’t look, bark or snuggle like dogs, the guide dogs we salute this week and the assistive technology they’ve inspired have something very important in common: both help the visually impaired lead more independent lives.”

You can read the full article at http://iq.intel.com/the-future-of-fetching-robotic-dogs-guide-the-blind/

Assistance Dogs in the Workplace: Wayne Wicklund and Snow Shadow

Hearing Dog Snow.Hearing Dog Snow helps Wayne Wicklund with his work as a computer tech and webmaster.

In the International Assistance Dog Week newsletter, we’ve been asking people to share their stories of their dogs in the workplace. Anne Wicklund wrote in from Arizona about her husband Wayne’s hearing dog, Snow, and Snow’s successor, Snow Shadow.

I have to tell you how valuable our service dog is to my husband. He is always at his side – of course – and has saved his life many times. Our Snow passed in September and his successor Snow Shadow is only 10 months old and already bossing his dad around.

Shadow:

• makes sure my husband goes to bed by 8 pm because HE knows Wayne is ill and/or tired,

• Shadow won’t let Wayne walk when he knows Wayne is too ill and too tired, and drags Wayne home

• When Wayne is away from home and becomes disoriented and confused, Shadow sits and waits for Wayne to recover then pulls him home or to the car

• Shadow alerts Wayne when needs his meds or inhaler

• Shadow alerts on sounds and danger, and people too close for comfort

• Shadow alerts on smells, allergic reactions and chemicals that shut down Wayne’s lungs

• Shadow braces Wayne until he regains his balance

Wayne works from home and volunteers at our local Museum –he is webmaster for the website, tech for all their computers, and volunteers at the VA for Viet Nam Veterans. Wayne and Shadow attend numerous political functions locally and around the world and travel extensively

Snow Prince and Snow Shadow have inspired the writing and publication of two books: “My Ears Have a Wet Nose: Acquiring, Training & Loving a Hearing Dog,” and “I Have a Wet Nose . . . and I have a job,” an educational coloring book about service dogs. The next book will be published in 2014, which is a “Handbook for Service Dogs: The do’s and don’ts.”


Read about Snow the chamber ambassador

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International Assistance Dog Week 2014 is August 3-9. Learn more about IADW and subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.assistancedogweek.org/about/.

Tell us how your assistance dog helped you to get and/or keep your job. Send in photos of you and your assistance dog at work. You can send your stories and photos to workinglikedogs@gmail.com.

Assistance Dogs in the Workplace: Kate Bales and Bonnie

August 4, 2014 · Posted in Service Dogs · Comment 
Kate Bales and Bonnie.Kate Bales and Assistance Dog Bonnie work together on nonfiction and fiction writing.

In the International Assistance Dog Week newsletter, we’ve been asking people to share their stories of their dogs in the workplace.

Although she describes herself as semi-retired, Kate Bales has found a new career as a writer. Here’s the story submitted by Kate Bales about her retirement career of writing, and how Bonnie has been a help and inspiration.

Bonnie and I are both semi-retired now, but she is heavily involved in my new retirement career as a novelist. Her somewhat unorthodox manner of performing her tasks is typical of a pit bull. Her greatest joy in life is to cause people to laugh. That gave me the incentive to write her life story, which was accepted for publication in an anthology.

From there, we branched out to fiction. We are currently working on a four book series about a group of internet list pit bull owners who charter various means of transportation and go on tours with their dogs. The first book in the series, “Crazy Ladies on a Bus”, was published last winter, and the second, “Crazy Ladies on a Train”, is nearly complete and is scheduled for release in late October. The combined antics of the dogs keeps the reader laughing hysterically throughout the stories, and an element of crime and just a smattering of romance are the glue that holds them together.

Bonnie, as my service dog, plays a leading role, as does my deaf pit bull, Fionna. Fionna has only one manner, and it is bad. If there is any way to get into trouble, she will find it. All proceeds from the series are being donated to pit bull rescues around the country.

We are also working on a serious novel about a mystery writer and Homeland Security. Internet research on the many ways to kill a person and cause nationwide panic has attracted their attention, and our writer is being held for investigation. His escape and the ensuing pursuit by various law enforcement agencies should captivate the reader. He was badly injured during one encounter and, while hiding in a remote area, comes across an abused, abandoned dog who helps him in his recovery, ultimately becoming a working service dog. Bonnie, working under a pseudonym, will be the dog who saves our writer.

Kate Bales & Bonnie
Elko, Nevada
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International Assistance Dog Week 2014 is August 3-9. Learn more about IADW and subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.assistancedogweek.org/about/.

Tell us how your assistance dog helped you to get and/or keep your job. Send in photos of you and your assistance dog at work. You can send your stories and photos to workinglikedogs@gmail.com.

Assistance Dogs in the Workplace: Lisa Loftis and Diabetes Alert Dog Ija

High School teacher Lisa Loftis and her Diabetes Alert Dog, Ija,  work at the Creative Education Preparatory Institute (CEPI).High School teacher Lisa Loftis and her Diabetes Alert Dog, Ija, work at the Creative Education Preparatory Institute (CEPI).

In the International Assistance Dog Week newsletter, we’ve been asking people to share their stories of their dogs in the workplace.

Here’s the story shared with us by Lisa Loftis.
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Language Arts teacher Lisa Loftis and her Diabetes Alert Dog, Ija, go to work each day during the school year at the Creative Education Preparatory Institute (CEPI),  a small charter high school in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Ija, whose name is pronounced with a long “e” sound to start, and ends with a sound like the last part of amnesia, Lisa says, has been paired with Lisa for about a year and a half. This was after about a year and a half of training.

Ija has helped Lisa a lot, alerting her to high or low blood sugar levels 15 – 20 minutes before her best equipment can. Lisa loves being a teacher and enjoys helping her students. Having Ija with her means Lisa loses much less teaching time

Everything went smoothly when Ija joined Lisa on the job. For one thing, the school administration at CEPI was fully aware that Lisa was training with Ija, and that Ija would be coming to school with Lisa when her training was complete. The students were also supportive. Key Club members even organized a fundraising project to help with expenses.

Ija was the first assistance dog at the school, and the school director had a few questions and concerns, but was very supportive. The administration just asked Lisa to keep Ija with her at all times and to keep her on leash. Whether in the classroom or the lunchroom, Ija is with Lisa.

A school visit by a dog trainer from Assistance Dogs of the West, the organization in Santa Fe that trained Ija, helped both the students and teachers at CEPI learn more about what Ija was trained to do and how they should behave around her.

Some students do still ask to pet Ija, but Lisa just tells them that they can pet her after they graduate. Then when her former students come back to CEPI to visit and tell Lisa what they’re doing, she makes good on her promise. Otherwise the students know that Ija is on the job, and shouldn’t be distracted.

Lisa also hears from students sometimes that they feel sorry for Ija because they think all she does is work. So Lisa started a Facebook page, in part to post pictures showing Ija when she’s not working. Ija enjoys swimming and hiking, going on vacation out-of-state during the summer, and sometimes just hanging out at home, lounging on the sofa.   

Whether at school, out for dinner, or visiting a doctor’s office, Lisa says the best confirmation that Ija is a well-trained assistance dog is hearing people say, “Oh, I didn’t even know your dog was with you,” when they see Ija get up and leave with her.

In addition to that, of course, is the fact that Ija is constantly attentive to Lisa, monitoring her diabetes and alerting her when needed. Having Ija on the job means Lisa can be better at her job of teaching high school students.
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Read this longer article about Lisa and Ija written by Kate Kelly: http://americacomesalive.com/2014/08/04/diabetic-alert-dog-permits-teacher-live-normally/

International Assistance Dog Week 2014 is August 3-9. Learn more about IADW and subscribe to the newsletter at http://www.assistancedogweek.org/about/.

Tell us how your assistance dog helped you to get and/or keep your job. Send in photos of you and your assistance dog at work. You can send your stories and photos to workinglikedogs@gmail.com.